Burn Permits and Restrictions

Questions and answers about fires and burning in Hauser Lake.

By Chief Simms

When do I need a burning permit?

Permits for burning are required during the Idaho Closed Burning Season which is usually from May 10 through October 20. Recreational fires do not require a permit but can be no larger than 3 feet in diameter and no more than 2 foot high in fuel. Outside of that time frame, as long as there is not a Burn Ban in effect, no permit is needed. Please note that the State of Idaho sometimes does extend the permit season beyond those dates, so this can change from time to time.

Click here for a press release from the Idaho Department of Lands (IDOL) about burn permit requirements.

Where can I get a permit?

Permits, when required, for hand stacked yard waste may be obtained online or at the fire station.

This the ‘self service’ online burn permit (and renewal) available as long as burning is allowed, for free, through the IDOL: burnpermits.idaho.gov

It is important that the permit holder has a permit in possession when they are burning. If you have trouble with the link, you can also still fill out a paper form, found in the white cabinet in the front of the Hauser Lake Fire Station.

All other types of permits (slash, machine stacked slash, etc.) need to be obtained from the Idaho Department of Lands, 3258 West Industrial Loop, Coeur d’Alene.

What if no one is at the fire station to issue a permit?

Please fill out the form in the white box/cabinet at the front of the fire station. Fill out two copies, one to take with you and one to leave in the box. You can also use the online link shown above to obtain a permit.

What does a permit cost?

Permits in the Hauser Lake Fire District are issued at no cost.

Will the fire department still come out if I am burning with a permit?

Even if you have a permit the fire department may still respond if called. If there is a complaint due to smoke from your fire we may have to extinguish the fire even if you have a permit.

When is burning banned?

When weather conditions dictate burning may be banned, which means no open flames of any kind. Watch for Burn Ban signs as you drive into the area for a ban notice.

Are there any other restrictions?

Yes!

  • The only items you can burn are wood and paper products;
  • you must call the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality at 208-666-4609 or visit their website;
  • you must have shovel and water on hand;
  • and you must be the property owner.

 

House Number Signs

House number signs may be purchased for only $15 through the HLFD.

Will the fire department, ambulance or sheriff be able to find your house when you need them? Precious time is often lost trying to find the right address. The numbers are small or they might be large enough but, because of color or placement, are hard to see—especially if it is dark, foggy or bad weather.

Address sign available through the HLFD
Identify your home with an address sign.

So that we can find you in an emergency, your address needs to be visible from the street (where your driveway meets the street, if not on the house itself) and if there is more than one home on the driveway, all should be clearly marked. It is wise to have a friend drive by your home at normal speed on a dark night when visibility is bad and tell you what your address is. This exercise can reveal if you need to change something.

To make it easy for homeowners, the Hauser Lake Volunteer Fire Department offers blue address signs, visible throughout the community, at cost—only $15.00 each. The signs are two-sided with 4-inch reflective numbers on a blue reflective background. Call the fire station at 773-1174 to order.

(An added bonus of having a well marked address is that UPS and FedEx can find you to deliver packages too!)

Hydrants and Smoke Detectors Reminder

Help us find the hydrant!

Keeping weeds cut during the spring and summer and shoveling the snow around hydrants during the winter season helps us find and use the fire hydrants when they are needed.

Remember to keep chimneys clean and your smoke detectors working. In the event of a power outage do not run open flame or catalytic heaters without making sure that there is plenty of ventilation. Electric heaters are a safer alternative indoors. If you need assistance changing smoke detector batteries, we will be more than happy to help out.

Remember that smoke detectors should be completely replaced after ten years.

Volunteer Opportunities

If you live in the Hauser Lake area, we encourage you to volunteer!

Hauser Lake Fire District map
Boundaries of the Hauser Lake Fire Protection District. Click for larger view.

If you live in the Hauser Lake area, we encourage you to volunteer! Volunteers can help in whatever capacity they are comfortable. If you are in good physical condition, can dedicate the time, and like to work with cool tools, you can volunteer as a firefighter and/or EMT.

If you don’t feel comfortable with that, have a bit less time, or are not physically able to be a full firefighter, we can still use your help and support. We have an Auxiliary that supports members during incidents and trainings and takes on various projects. We can also utilize someone who may have a particular expertise or would simply want to help out with maintenance, administrative, fire prevention or other functions.

If you’re not interested in being a firefighter or EMT, the Hauser Lake Fire Auxiliary might be a great way for you to still help out and support the fire department. The Fire Auxiliary hosts our open house, helps with various projects around the station, and supports the firefighters during a fire by providing food and drinks to the firefighters.

If any of these avenues sound like something you would like to do, please contact us at the fire station for more information or just stop by for a chat with the Chief who is at the station most weekdays from 7 am to 4 pm.

 

Resource Links

Local Emergency Resources:

 

Community:

Kids:

Education:

County Offices:

  • CountyOffice.org – database of county government offices in the United States. Locate your county assessor, board of elections, chamber of commerce, child support offices, colleges, coroner, courts, and more. (This site was recommended by a member of the public as a one-stop location to find government entities.)

A Tradition of Community Service

This beautiful cast bronze bell serves as an ongoing symbol of the District’s commitment to voluntary community service.

This beautiful cast bronze bell serves as an ongoing symbol of the District’s commitment to voluntary community service.
The bell reads, “Hauser Lake Volunteer Fire Dept, Est 1952”

The HLVFD now proudly displays the beautiful cast bronze bell which serves as an ongoing symbol of the District’s commitment to voluntary community service. It is rung to mark the beginning and end of ceremonies, meetings and other events.

Credits: The bell was purchased with funds from the HLFPD and HLFD Auxiliary. The District is grateful to retired Engineer Ken Birge for the idea and preliminary research. He and retired Captain Scott Weston built the hickory frame housing the bell. The pull is knotted and tied by Chief Larry Simms. The cloth cover (not shown) was made by Auxiliary member Rita Birge.

The District thanks Chips and Sparks Creations of Harpster, Idaho for the engraving.

History of the HLVFD

The Hauser Lake Fire Department was organized in 1952 by residents within the community to provide some means of fire protection for the area.

By Chief Larry Simms

The Hauser Lake Fire Department was organized in 1952 by residents within the community to provide some means of fire protection for the area. The first fire station was a 20- by 14-foot brick building with an oil stove to keep water from freezing inside the station.

The department’s first truck was a 1934 Chevrolet truck with a 500-gallon tank and a small pump on the back. We still own that fire truck and it is displayed in area parades.

The original fire station was hit by a car, which made it unusable so a new pole building was built to serve as the fire station. Part of the project included a community room for groups like the Boy Scouts, 4-H and others to use. That building has had two additions since then to accommodate our growing needs.

In 1975 the Hauser Lake Fire Protection District was officially chartered as a taxing fire district by the state of Idaho. Our District covers approximately 20 square miles of a combination of residential, commercial and urban interface (forest land).

In the years since that first fire truck, we have purchased several vehicles and converted them to the fire service. We have had used utility and ex-military trucks that have been surplused by various government agencies and then modified by our members for use as fire trucks.

The first “true” fire engine we obtained was a 1952 American LaFrance pumper purchased by the Mobbs family and, after three tries, was eventually bought by the fire district. Our current fleet now consists of a 2009 type II ambulance used for medical calls; a 1966 military chassis converted to supply 2000 gal water with a pump; a 2009 Pumper/Tender; a 2001 compressed air foam brush truck; a 2006 Spartan pumper, purchased with a $245,000 grant from the Department of Homeland Security; a 1998 support vehilce; a fire boat obtained through cooperation with the Kootenai County Sheriff’s Department; and a 2001 command vehicle.

We currently respond to an average of 175 to 200 emergency calls per year providing emergency medical services, fire suppression, fire prevention, education, inspections, rescue and mutual aid to other departments in the county. Members of our department also participate in countywide emergency planning, coordination and response in the event of a major emergency.

Over the years the Hauser Lake Fire Protection District has been a leader in Kootenai County emergency services. For example, among our members we have one of the original ice rescue trainers in the state, Gary Mobbs, who is also a member of the sheriff dive rescue team. Also, the Neils family manufactures one of the leading gas powered ventilation fans used in firefighting and has several family members involved in the department. Many of our volunteers are leaders in their industries as well as providing training to other firefighters throughout the state.

Our volunteers have helped us to provide a professional service to the community at a very economical cost. In addition we have received over $1,500,000 in grants, for our department and the county, since 2000, helping to keep the tax burden to our residents as low as possible while providing a level of protection equivalent to communities many times our size in both population and budgets.